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English
Math
Science
Social Studies
Business
Health
Computer Science
Driver education
Fine Arts
Foreign Languages
Tech education
Family education

 

 

English

ENGLISH 9 -- 1.0 Credit

English 9 is a continuation of the middle school English Language Arts curriculum but also a foundation course in the high school English Language Arts curriculum.

The course “continues to practice and review skills learned in earlier grades,” ( WCSU English Language Arts document) it also becomes more extensive and intensive in text selections and assignments. As an aid to development, the 8th grade essay portfolios are used to improve and enhance students’ narrative and expository writing.

The course covers a selection of literature, which includes short stories from around the world, classic and contemporary drama and a variety of novels and poetry.

Evaluation and assessment of student performance is based on all written assignments - class and homework; class participation - reading and presenting; tests and quizzes. There is a mid-term and a final exam in this course.

 

ENGLISH 10 -- Level 2 -- 1.0 Credit

Students in English will review the  skills learned in the previous year and make improvements where  they are weakest.  They will move on from the mini-essay to longer expository writing and to class appreciation and discussion  of poetry, short  stories, plays, and  the novel.  The focus on writing will be primarily on the  extended essay.  Evaluation will be based on completion of assignments, homework, papers, quizzes, tests, and class participation.

 

English 10 -- Level  1 -- 1.0 Credit

The emphasis in this course will be on British literature and language.  Students will study Anglo-Saxon poetry, poetry of the English Medieval Period, various poets and poems of the English Renaissance, including works by Shakespeare, literature of the Victorian era, including novels, and, if time allows, short works by twentieth century British writers.  Context is stressed; accordingly, we study not only the literature but also the socio-economic and political climate that contributed to its creation.  Important themes include heroism, honor, individuality, and adherence to a moral code.  Writing practice focuses on extended literary analysis but also includes opportunities for writing fiction, poetry, and personal essays.  Evaluation will be based on tests, quizzes, papers, presentations, class participation and homework.

 

ENGLISH 11 -- Level 2 -- 1.0 Credit

Concurrent enrollment in U.S. History required

Students in English 11, Level 2 will read novels, short

stories, poems, and plays written by famous American authors.  Class will focus on understanding the literature we  are reading, and how  that literature is related to  American History,  as  well as  on vocabulary  study  and work  on basic writing skills.  Emphasis is placed on writing research papers and these are done  together  with  the  history  class. Grades  are based on class participation,  papers,  tests, quizzes, and  homework.  

  

ENGLISH 11 -- Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Concurrent enrollment in U.S. History required

English 11, Level 1 is a  study of American Literature, especially as it relates  to  American History.  Students  will read  classic  novels, plays, stories,  and poems  by  American authors.  Discussion  and writing  will be focused on the analysis of the readings, and is intended to prepare students for college-level work.  Skills necessary for the writing of research papers will be covered, and skills-work to prepare  for the SAT’s will also be part of  the  course.   Reading  assignments  will  be  extensive  and demanding. Evaluation  will  be   based  on  tests,   quizzes,  essays,  papers,  class participation  and  homework.   

 

ENGLISH 12 -- Level 2 -- 1.0 Credit

During the academic  year in English  12, Level 2,  students will review and expand  the skills  of English 11,  Level 2.  Course work will include  the  reading  of  novels, short  stories,  plays  and  poetry.  Students will  be required to  write a variety  of short papers which  demonstrate   organized  reasoning  and   basic  composition  skills. Evaluation  will  be   based  on  class   participation,  homework,  writing assignments, tests and quizzes.

 

English 12 -- Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

The English 12, Level 1 course, the last in the regular four-year English sequence, will focus on clear, persuasive writing and analytical reading.  Students will read texts by American, British, and World authors.  Discussion and writing will be focused on the analysis of the readings.  Reading and writing assignments will be extensive and demanding, preparing students for college-level study.  Several analytical papers are required.  Evaluation will be based on tests, quizzes, papers, presentations,  class participation and homework.

 

ENGLISH 12 Advanced Placement -- 1.5 Credit

Prerequisites: A grade of 85% or higher in 11th grade English and the permission of the instructor.

The Advanced Placement  English course in  Literature and Composition is primarily a  course in  the development  of skills  in critical  analysis covering a wide range of ideas.  It is for students capable of doing college-level work in  English while they are  in high school, who are willing to devote  the energy necessary  to complete a  course more rigorous and  demanding  than  other  high  school  English  courses  designed  for a college-bound student. For the  literature component, students will develop abilities to read critically, read  with understanding a range of literature that is rich in  quality and representative of  different literary forms and historical  periods and  read  a literary   text  analytically,  seeing relationships between form and content.  For the writing component, students will  develop  abilities to  view  writing  as a  developed  discipline that includes  collecting information,  formulating  ideas and  determining their relationships, drafting paragraphs and arranging them in an appropriate order with transition between them, and revising what they have written. Students will  also  write  appropriately  for  different  occasions,  audiences, and purposes such as persuading, explaining, describing, and interpreting. This course is  designed to prepare  students for the  Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition examination given by the College Board. Advanced Placement students are required to take this exam.

 

Journalism -- Grades 9-12, Elective -- .50 Credit

This class writes the articles for the school paper that is published together with the Desktop Publishing class. Learn to write in newspaper style; learn about issues faced by journalists; learn how newspapers get put together.  See your work in print. Grades are based on participation and written work.

 

CREATIVE WRITING -- Grades 9-12, Elective -- .50 Credit

If you like to write, you should take this class.  The class focuses on fiction writing and poetry.  It is an informal class. There are no quizzes or tests.  Grades are based on participation and writing. Each student produces a portfolio of finished work, and contributes to the literary magazine.

 

PUBLIC SPEAKING -- Grades 9-12, Elective -- .50 Credit

Public Speaking will introduce the student to a variety of speaking skills that can be put to practical use in adult life and develop confidence and competence in various speaking situations. Informative, persuasive and entertaining speeches will be studied and performed. Skill in reading from a manuscript, memorization, impromptu and extemporaneous deliveries will be practiced. Interviewing and argumentation will be explored. This elective is recommended to college-bound students as well as to general track students who wish to further develop their communication and research skills. Evaluation will be based on class participation, the meeting of deadlines, homework, projects and overall preparation of assignments. Text: SPEECH: Skill, Process, Practice.

 

Theatre arts -- Grades 9-12, Elective -- .50 Credit

This class covers the full spectrum of theatre arts from plays and playwriting to design and technical production to actual performance.  Students will have a chance to build acting and presentation skills and gain experience through improvisation, exercises, character studies, monologues, and scenes.  In addition, the basics of directing and design will be covered including stage movement, "business," logistics, use of color, types of stages, styles of design, interpreting a script.   Students will also read several plays together as they explore different periods in the long, rich history of theatre. 

A look at careers in the lively arts, as well as guest presenters and a trip to see at least one production will round out the course.

Assignments will include occasional quizzes, production (acting and directing) of monologues and scenes, reviews of two plays and a film; design of set, costumes and lighting; reading of plays and background information; mid-term and  end-of-semester projects.

This class may be taken for a quarter only or for the full term and earns a half or full fine arts credit accordingly.

Math

General  Math -- Grades 9-10, Level 3 -- 1.0 credit

Prerequisite:  Math 8 and teacher recommendation.

This course is a review and further development of the fundamental math skills needed to prepare a student for more advanced high school mathematics classes.  Students learn to cope with the frustrations of mathematics and pursue a variety of strategies to unlock the principles of mathematics. Organizational and study skills are emphasized.  Textbooks include: Gateways to Algebra and Geometry (McDougall, Littell), Mathematics - A Human Endeavor (W H Freeman), and the Saxon series (65,76, and Algebra .5).

 

Technically Speaking -- Grades 10 -12, Level 3 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: General Math and teacher recommendation.

This course extends the concepts learned in General Math  It is designed for the student who is still not quite ready for the traditional high school math progression. Students will receive individual attention as needed.  A wide variety of resources will be used.  Topics include algebra, geometry, probability, word problems, logic, personal budgets, career surveys, and basic skill work.

 

Basic Algebra -- Grades 9-12, Level 2 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Math 8 or General Math and teacher recommendation.

This course deals with problem-solving from an algebraic perspective.  Students learn the language of algebra to solve simple equations and work with algebraic expressions.  Graphing and other data analysis will be used to help students feel more comfortable with organizing and using mathematics. Text is HRW, Algebra 1 Interactions, Part 1.

 

BASIC GEOMETRY -- Grades 10-12, Level 2 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I or Basic Algebra and teacher recommendation.

This is an introductory course to the practical aspects of geometry.  Topics include: the properties of angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, circles and other two-dimensional shapes, area, perimeter, volume, ratio and proportion, geometric construction, and right angle trigonometry. Students will complete a variety of two and three-dimensional hands-on projects.  The text used is Discovering Geometry: An Intuitive Approach (Key Curriculum).

 

CONSUMER MATH -- Grades 11-12, Level 2/3 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: teacher recommendation.

Topics in this course relate to problems that consumers face in everyday life.  Topics include: housing, income and expenses, taxes, consumer credit, banking and loans, insurance, and investments.  Solid arithmetic skills are important.  A calculator is strongly recommended.  The text is Consumer Mathematics (Houghton, Mifflin).

 

Algebra I Part 1 -- Grades 8-12, Level 1 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Math 7 or Math 8 and teacher recommendation.

Topics include simplifying expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, linear systems, operations with rational numbers, graphing, and integrates all of these in problem solving. The text used is Algebra I (McDougall, Littell).

 

Algebra I Part 2  -- Grades 9-12, Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Part 1 and teacher recommendation.

Topics include functions and function notation, polynomials, real numbers, factoring, quadratics, graphing and graphing translations, more equations and continues to develop new ways to solve problems. Students will finish the text used in Algebra 1 part 1 and start the text used in Algebra 2 semester 3.

 

GEOMETRY -- Grades 9-12, Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra 1, parts 1 & 2 and teacher recommendation.

This is a rigorous course in Euclidean geometry.  The student is expected to demonstrate a high level of reasoning by writing proofs and solving problems dealing with points, lines, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, and other shapes.  Students study area, perimeter, and volume and the connections between the three dimensions. Students will complete a variety of two and three-dimensional hands-on projects.  The texts used are Geometry (Houghton, Mifflin) and Flatland (Abbott).  

 

ALGEBRA II -- Algebra II Grades 10-12 Level 1  -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I Parts 1 and 2, Geometry, and teacher recommendation

This course extends the study of the topics of Algebra I Parts 1 and 2 and assumes a strong working knowledge of those topics. It encompasses the study of functions including logarithmic functions, irrational and complex numbers, polynomial equations, analytic geometry, conic sections, and series and sequences. The text is Algebra II (McDougall, Littell).

It is recommended that students have access to a graphing calculator, TI 81 - TI 83 Series.

PRE-CALCULUS -- Grades 11-12, Level 1 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite:  Algebra II Level 1 and Geometry, or teacher recommendation.

This course is designed to complete the preparation for college level calculus and will include topics such as trigonometry, introductory functional analysis, matrices, polar coordinates, series and sequences, probability and conic sections.   It is critical that students have access to a scientific and/or graphing calculator.  The text being used is Advanced Mathematics (McDougall, Littell).

 

Advanced Mathematics -- Grades 12, Level 1  -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite:  Pre-Calculus and teacher recommendation.

This course will be offered as an alternative to Calculus.  One or the other will be offered each year based on the needs and interests of students. Topics will be selected from probability, statistics, number theory, trigonometry and other aspects of finite mathematics. 

 

AP Calculus -- Grades 11-12, Level 1 1.5 Credit

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus and teacher recommendation.

This is a rigorous one-year course designed to prepare students for the College Board Advance Placement Examination, level AB (equivalent to 1 or 2 semesters of college calculus).  This course will include a review of the elementary functions and a study of topics in the differential and integral calculus.  Students taking this class should anticipate two hours of homework per night.  The primary text is Calculus and AnalyticGeometry (Thomas and Finney).

Science

GENERAL PHYSICAL SCIENCE(GPS) -- Grade 9, Level 2/3 -- 1.0 Credit

This is a course in physical science, designed to meet the needs of students who do not plan to take either chemistry or physics later in their high school careers. However, successful completion of GPS does prepare students for chemistry and/or physics. .  GPS covers more material, but in less depth, than the corresponding Level 1 course. This course explores the basic workings of matter and energy in our environment and in the universe. Specific topics include motion, forces, work and simple machines; properties of substances, atoms, elements, compounds, and chemical reactions; heat; electricity and magnetism; sound and light.  Laboratory experiments will be used to illustrate each topic, so that students will gain experience in observing, measuring, and analyzing data.  Students will be expected to learn how to solve physical problems which involve simple calculations, but algebra is not required.

Science graduation credit will be awarded for either GPS   or IPS, not both. 

Text: Cooney, Pasachoff & Pasachoff, Physical Science, Scott, Forsman (1990).

 

INTRO TO PHYSICAL SCIENCE(IPS) -- Grade 9, Level 1 --
1.0 Credit

This is a course in introductory physical science designed to serve as a solid foundation for those planning to take later courses in physics, chemistry and biology. Its objective is to give the student a beginning knowledge of physical science and to offer some insight into the means by which scientific knowledge is acquired. Topics covered include volume and mass, characteristic properties, solubility,  classification of matter, atomic model of matter, sizes of atoms and  molecules. The method used is extensive student laboratory work using the discovery approach. Because of the integrated nature of the laboratory component, it is usually not possible to transfer into this  course after the beginning of the semester Students are expected to  be adept at arithmetic calculations, ratio-proportion, and graphing, and to make occasional use of their Algebra I skills.

Science graduation credit will be awarded for either GPS or IPS, not both.

Text: INTRODUCTORY PHYSICAL SCIENCE by Uri Haber-Schaim, et. al..

 

BIOLOGY -- Grade 10, Level 2/3 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of GPS or IPS.

The science of biology is the study of life. In this course, we try to explain how things in life work and why things happen the way they do. Emphasis is placed on how biological concepts and ideas relate to the student. Coursework is a mixture of hands-on exploration activities, lab work, and traditional classwork. Text: Johnson, Brusca, et al., BIOLOGY: VISUALIZING LIFE, Holt (1994).

 

BIOLOGY -- Grade 10, Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of GPS or IPS.

The science of biology is the study of life. In this course, we investigate biological chemistry, cell biology, classification of organisms, relationships among organisms, ecology, human impacts on the environment, genetics, evolution, and human anatomy and physiology.   The course satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the college bound student. A project, an oral  presentation, and  a research paper are required. Text: Johnson, Brusca, et al., BIOLOGY: VISUALIZING LIFE, Holt (1994).

 

ADVANCED BIOLOGY -- Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of level 1 Biology and Chemistry and permission of the instructor.

The first half of this course consists of a teacher-centered approach to some current research  areas in biology. After this exposure, students will choose a research area of interest to them and, for the second half of the course, engage in an in-depth, experiment-oriented study of the topic. This course is not designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/STUDIES -- Grade 11, Level 1, 2, 3 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of GPS or IPS and Level 1 or 2 Biology.

Environmental  Science/Studies  seeks  to  understand  the  relationship between  humans and  the environment.   In  this course  we will  study such topics  as terrestrial  and  aquatic ecosystems,  evolution  and adaptation, population  dynamics, water  quality and  testing, energy  and environmental issues. Much  of our  time will  be spent  outdoors as  well as  in the lab, supplemented  by  lectures,  discussions  and  other  activities.  Resources include a text, articles, films, videos  and guest speakers.  Grades will be based on participation,  written assignments, a  science notebook, tests and quizzes.  A  project is required  and is  a major portion  of each quarter’s grade. Text: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: THE WAY THE WORLD WORKS,  Bernard J. Nebel.

 

CHEMISTRY I -- Grades 10 or 11, Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of GPS or IPS, mastery of Algebra I part II, and enrollment in a higher Math course during the current or immediately preceding semester.

The science of Chemistry is the study of the nature of matter.  In this course, we review the classification of matter and basic atomic theory as presented in earlier science courses, and then build on these ideas to develop the modern “orbital model” of the atom.  We use this model to understand the regularities among the elements, the way elements bond together to form compounds, and the way elements and compounds participate in chemical reactions.  Finally, we apply this knowledge to a survey of the many compounds of carbon.  In each case, we attempt to relate the observed behavior of matter to its supposed unseen structure.  Often, this process can be quite quantitative, using mathematical tools such as arithmetic, fractions, ratio-proportion, graphs, and simple algebra.  Additional mathematical tools are reviewed or introduced as part of this course.

Throughout the course, laboratory experiments are used to introduce and illustrate new topics.  In the laboratory, the emphasis is on safe, careful observing, precise measuring, and clear, thoughtful reporting.  Text: Davis et al., MODERN CHEMISTRY, Holt (1999).

 

CHEMISTRY II -- Grades 10 or 11, Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of  Chemistry I, and enrollment in a Math course beyond Algebra I, Part II during the current or immediately preceding semester.

This course is a sequel to Chemistry I, similar in both spirit and style.  Building on the ideas and skills introduced in Chemistry I, we investigate the nature of gases, liquids, and solids, finally developing the “kinetic” model of large-scale matter and the idea of dynamic equilibrium.  We then apply these ideas to a study of solutions, acids/bases, chemical reaction rates, and electrochemistry.  The course ends with a brief introduction to nuclear chemistry.  This course should provide adequate preparation for the SAT2 Chemistry test, as well as many college courses in Chemistry, Biology, Health Sciences, and Environmental Science.  Text: Davis et al., MODERN CHEMISTRY, Holt (1999).

 

PHYSICS I -- Grades 11 or 12, Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of GPS or IPS, mastery of Geometry and Algebra II; continued study of Math

The goal of Physics is to understand the fundamental principles which govern the way the physical world works.  In this introductory course, we observe the workings of the world in a series of simple experiments, we summarize these observations in a small number of laws, and we use these laws to solve interesting problems and to predict new phenomena.  Our prime focus is the motion of objects: velocity, acceleration, force, gravity, momentum, energy and heat, with an emphasis on the concept of force.  The treatment of these topics requires the application of algebra, geometry, and graphing — as well as vectors and simple trigonometry, both of which are introduced during the first half of the course.  Thus it is wise to enroll in an advanced math course at the same time, or during the previous semester.  Although Chemistry is not a prerequisite for Physics, a course in Chemistry does provide valuable background in both the laboratory and quantitative methods of Physics.  Students who are successful in this course will probably want to continue with Physics II in a subsequent semester. Text: Hecht, PHYSICS: Algebra/Trig, Brooks/Cole (1998).

 

Physics II -- Grades 11 or 12, Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Physics I

This course is a natural sequel to Physics I.  Here we use the concepts developed in Physics I to investigate a number of topics that broaden our study of motion: waves, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, relativity and the atom.  The style and structure of the course will be similar to Physics I, with slightly more emphasis on the interplay between experiment and theory.  This is not an Advanced Placement course, but it should provide solid preparation for the SAT2 Physics test and/or college major courses in science and engineering. Text: Hecht, PHYSICS: Algebra/Trig, Brooks/Cole (1998).

Social Studies

 

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT -- 1.0 Credit

This course is a study of the basic functions of our federal government.  Topics include Constitutional evolution from the Magna Carta to the present, the Bill of Rights and how they affect our everyday lives, and the rights and responsibilities of citizens.  Other topics investigated include comparative governments, the influence of special interests and government anti-poverty programs.

 

VERMONT HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY & GOVERNMENT --
1.0 Credit

This course is traditionally offered in the ninth grade.  It is a one-semester course.  The content is made of three parts: the history of Vermont from the pre-contact period to the completion of the Civil War and Vermont’s role in Reconstruction; the general physical and cultural geography of Vermont; and the origins of Vermont government with Vermont’s role in the federal system emphasized.

This course provides the basic skills for the taking of further courses in this department.  Refer to the introduction to this section for a statement about social studies prerequisites.  The text utilized in this course is Cheney’s Vermont: A State with a Storybook Past.  Grading is based on quizzes, tests, reports, homework, notebook checks, and oral reports.

 

GLOBAL STUDIES -- Level 2 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful demonstration of core social studies skills listed in the introduction.

This course is designed to improve students’ knowledge and understanding of the culture, geography, and major issues facing the people of Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia.  This course focuses on the basic skills rather than intrinsic research.  At present the text is Global History: Geopolitical Patterns and Cultural Diffusion.  Grades will be based on class participation, homework, quizzes, and tests. 

 

GLOBAL STUDIES -- Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful demonstration of core social studies skills listed in the introduction and a recommendation from last year’s social studies teacher.

This course will consist of a more in-depth study of the culture, geography, and major issues facing the people of Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia.  Students will be expected to immerse themselves in cultures present or available here at Leland and Gray.  (e.g. exchange students and guest speakers)  At present there is no single text, but the Regional Studies Series is utilized instead.  Grades will be based on class participation, homework, quizzes, and tests. 

 

ASIAN STUDIES -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful demonstration of core social studies skills listed in the introduction and successful completion of Global Studies or permission of the instructor.

This is a small group seminar for students who are interested in the further study of Asia: its people, histories, and cultures.  The goal of the course is to provide a basis for an understanding of the complexity and richness of these civilizations.  Each student will be required to read a work of Asian literature and to do several research projects.  Grades will be based on participation, quizzes, and projects.

 

UNITED STATES HISTORY -- Level 2, Grade 11 -- 1.0 Credit

Concurrent enrollment in English 11

Prerequisite: Successful demonstration of core social studies skills listed in the introduction.

This  is a survey course in twentieth century United States History.  The students will explore major themes and challenges that have persisted throughout our history.  Students are expected to maintain a notebook, participate in discussions, research and write thesis papers, take regular tests, and write reaction papers based on primary sources, controversial issues and outside readings.  The text is America: Pathways to the Present and is heavily supplemented by other sources.

 

UNITED STATES HISTORY -- Level 1, Grade 11 -- 1.0 Credit

Concurrent enrollment in English 11

Prerequisite: Successful demonstration of core social studies skills listed in the introduction and a recommendation from last year’s social studies teacher.

In addition to the level 2 description, students will explore critical issues such as the Constitution, economic theory, foreign policy, and human rights.  The level 1 course will also cover more themes and content, and do so in more depth.

 

PSYCHOLOGY & CRIMINAL JUSTICE -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful demonstration of core social studies skills listed in the introduction and a recommendation from last year’s social studies teacher.

This course is really two courses put together.  It is designed for juniors and seniors who are college bound and would like a better understanding of the basic theories of human behavior and the criminal justice system in America.  Psychology looks at sensation, perception, conditioning, memory, development, and abnormal psychology.  Criminal Justice explores crime and criminals, police functions and organizations, the court system, adjudication, sentencing, and corrections.  The two texts are Understanding Psychology and Criminal Justice: The Core.  Grades will be based on tests, participation in discussions, papers, projects and reaction papers.

 

SENIOR SURVIVAL -- .5 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful demonstration of core social studies skills listed in the introduction.

A survey course designed for the student who wishes to increase his or her knowledge of life skills.  Topics will include job interviewing skills, budgeting, banking and credit, tax preparation, insurance, housing, and automobile rental and purchasing.  As a class, students will choose additional units that will be of interest in establishing a healthy, independent life.  Students will also read and discuss current news items and relate the articles to on-going events in American politics and society.  Students will be graded on participation, homework, quizzes, tests, and research projects.  All readings and unit source information will be provided by the instructor.

 

WESTERN CIVILIZATION -- Level 1 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful demonstration of core social studies skills listed in the introduction and a recommendation from last year’s social studies teacher.

This is an AP-level European history course starting with the dawn of written history through the present.  Topics range from Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, the Age of Monarchies, the French Revolution to the twentieth century.  The text is McKay’s A History of Western Society.  As this course is designed for high achieving students, the course load is heavy and includes reading several novels, writing thesis papers, doing individual and group presentations and teaching a section.  Grading will be based on tests, papers, and presentations.


Business
Health
Computer Science

Software Applications -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Software Applications is an in depth look at a variety of software tools available. Students will work in groups and individually on web pages, data bases, spreadsheets, desktop publishing, scanning, and video and image editing. They will select a series of projects using basic and advanced software features in software such as Adobe “PhotoShop,” “PageMaker,” “GoLive,” and Apple “iMovie”. Emphasis will be placed on projects that incorporate the use of two or more pieces of software. Some projects like the Winter Activities database will benefit the entire school community.

 

Desktop Publishing -- 1.0 Credit

This one-semester, full block, student-run class (or full year option to students who are part of the Yearbook staff). 

The major emphasis will be on student generated design and layouts combining text material, graphics, and photographs for calendars, brochures, and programs. The class is a combination of individual projects and teamwork. The Leland & Gray Annual Report and the Program of Studies design and layout will be done in this class depending on which semester the class is offered. In conjunction with the Journalism and Creative Writing classes the layout design of the student school newspaper and the school literary magazine are projects for students in this class. Portions of the Leland & Gray yearbook may be created by those students who are members of the yearbook staff.

 

Art and Technology -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Beginning level art class.

This course will explore contemporary aesthetic and technical issues with graphic design, internet based studio and exhibition work through web page design, and the creation of movies and videos which incorporate visual imagery as well as sound, time, and story. Students will examine new developments in technology and the options for creating imagery directly on the computer now available to graphic artists. A significant amount of time will be devoted to the invention of a plot line, planning, filming, and digital editing a movie during the course. This counts as a Fine Art Credit.

 

WEB PAGE DESIGN -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Learn the basic skills to design aesthetic web sites with an emphasis on page and site coordination. The focus will be on how effective web sites are crafted including the principals of good navigation. Students will work with a variety of techniques for creating and placing graphic elements. Page and site editing will be done using Adobe “Golive” software.

 

Computer Programming I -- Grades 10-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Sophomore class standing.

According to the Department of Labor reports the need for Computer Scientists and Systems Analysts will grow dramatically in the next ten years. Introductory modular programming using Scheme to create clearly written, error-free programs in a variety of areas will give you an entry level background in this field. The class will emphasize good program design by the inherent structured nature of this compiled language. Students will write programs to solve a variety of educational and business related problems.

It is recommended that you have taken “Software Applications.” Text: Felleisen, Findler, Flatt, and Krishnamurthi, How to Design Programs, MIT Press, 2001

 

 

Fine

Driver education
Fine Arts

BAND -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Band is for students who have had at least one year of lessons on a band instrument and meet the requirements for entry into the school band. The band will perform at least two public concerts, march in town parades and may provide music for basketball games at Leland and Gray. Students will have an opportunity to rent instruments. Band meets daily all year long. Students will be scheduled for a half period private or semi-private lesson that is rotated throughout the school year. Note: Students may sign up for both band and chorus.

 

CHORUS -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0  Credit

Chorus is for any student in grades 9-12 and meets five days a week. The chorus will perform in at least two school concerts each year, and other outside events that are appropriate. All styles of choral music will be explored and performed. Note: Music electives fulfill the Fine Arts requirement. Students may sign up for both band and chorus.

 

INTRO TO MUSIC THEORY -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Music Theory is offered to interested students in grades 9-12. Ear training, dictation, harmony and solfege (sight singing)  will be taught. Basics of counterpoint, chord  progressions and conducting will also be explored.

 

FOUNDATIONS OF ART -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Foundations of Art is a studio class which begins by focusing entirely on drawing from observation with pencil, charcoal, ink, and other materials.  If you’ve always wanted to learn how to draw, this is the class for you!  The course then expands to include an introduction to painting, monoprinting, collage, and graphic design using the computer as a tool.  Basic principles of visual expression as well as art historical styles and periods are explored.The second quarter will emphasize form, function and space in sculpture.  Students will be introduced to a variety of sculptural media and respond to a variety of spatial problems posed by the instructor.    Students will learn the basics of throwing clay on the wheel, slab and coil clay construction, plaster mold-making, found object construction, as well as other sculptural media  Homework drawings constitute a significant part of the grade for this course.  Maintaining a sketchbook is part of the process which culminates in a portfolio presentation at the end of each quarter.

 

Advanced 2 and 3 Dimensional Art -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Beginning level art credit

This course builds from the Foundations course and expands the complexity and sophistication of assignments and visual problems in drawing, painting, collage,  printmaking, ceramics and sculpture.  At the end of the semester  students will propose and pursue an independent course of study in a single medium with a consistent thematic and stylistic vision.  Homework drawings constitute a significant part of the grade for this course.   The course culminates in a portfolio review at the end of each quarter.

 

Art and Technology -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Beginning level art class.

This course will explore contemporary aesthetic and technical issues with graphic design, internet based studio and exhibition work through web page design, and the creation of movies and videos which incorporate visual imagery as well as sound, time, and story. We will examine new developments in technology and the options for creating imagery directly on the computer now available to graphic artists. Students will devote a significant amount of time to the invention of a plot line, planning, filming, and digital editing a movie during the course.

 

Design and Printmaking -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

This course is a studio based course that focuses on basic design principles, color theory, graphic design and advertising.  The course includes papermaking, paper marbling, bookmaking, screen printing, monoprinting, block printing, and computer graphics.  Artistic principles such as composition, balance, impact, surprise and storytelling will be explored through these materials.  Students will have an opportunity to focus on a single area of design (architecture, computer graphics, fashion design, product design, interior design, or advertising) in an independent project at the end of the semester.  Homework drawings constitute a significant part of the grade for this course. 

 

Ceramics & Sculpture Intensive -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

This course will concentrate on three dimensional forms of art in the creation of functional and aesthetic objects.  The course will include carving in wood and plaster, assemblage with metal, wood and found objects, moldmaking and casting objects with wax, paper, and clay, bookmaking, and ceramic work including slab construction and throwing on the wheel.  This course will also incorporate installation work and contemporary technologies in the organization of space to create meaning.  We will examine the way sculpture has been created and perceived through history in various cultures and look at historical styles and techniques.  Homework drawings constitute a significant part of the grade for this course. 

 

Painting Intensive -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Beginning level art credit

Painting Intensive students will be assigned various studio problems in oils, acrylics, watercolors, and monoprints.  We will explore painting realistically as well as studying and responding to other painting styles of the 20th century: abstract, expressionist, impressionist, abstract expressionist, surrealist, dada, and postmodern.  Students will be exposed to advanced concepts in color theory.  An objective of the course will be the development and cultivation of individual style in painting.  Homework drawings constitute a significant part of the grade for this course.   This course may be taken as part of the process of building a portfolio for the Advanced Placement Exam in Studio Art.

 

Advanced Placement Studio Art -- Grade 12 -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Students wishing to create a portfolio for consideration in the AP Studio Art Examination may enroll in this course.  We will investigate and meet the requirements of the AP Art Exam, and students will develop a concentration of their own work in a body of work driven by their own interests.  Students enrolling in this course should plan to work all year on their art.

 

Photography I -- 1.0 Credit -- Prerequisite: One credit of art.

This introductory level course will aquaint students with the history, materials, and techniques of photography.  While the course will be rooted in the present, students will spend time exploring the history of photography, from the camera obscura to digital imagery, as well as studying the work of acknowledged masters of the medium. The emphasis of the course is the refinement of vision, learning to see as the camera sees, and translating that vision to film and print. Students will begin work with a large format camera, so while a 35mm or other camera with manual controls may prove useful, it is not required.   Grades will be based on regular attendance and class participation, maintenance of a master notebook, quizzes, tests, a semester project, and a final exam.   A $25 lab fee for film and chemistry will be assessed each student; individuals will be responsible for purchasing their own printing paper.semester long course, fall,  1 fine art credit. Class enrollment limited to 8.

 

Photography II -- 1.0 Credit

Prerquisite: Successful completion of Photography I.                                                             

A continuation of Photo I, the emphasis in this course will be the further refinement of  photographic vision.  Students will work toward the realization of their personal vision through intentional work on the Zone System of film exposure, development, and printing, as well as continue to study the work of noted photographers. While the bulk of our work will be in black and white, some time will be allotted for discussion and exploration of alternative processes, including digital technology.  In addition to grading criteria for Photo I,  students will be expected to complete a semester project/photo essay on a topic of their choice. Lab fee: $25; students purchase their own film and paper, and a 35mm or other camera with manual controls would be useful. Semester long course, spring: 1 fine art credit.  Class enrollment limited to 8.


Foreign Languages

FRENCH I -- 1.0 Credit

This course provides a beginning student with a basic knowledge of French. It introduces the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, but puts more emphasis in oral communication with high frequency vocabulary and activities that encourage the learner to speak. The student also gets acquainted with the culture of the French speaking world. Grades are based on weekly quizzes or tests, exams, homework and oral participation. Textbook: BLEU. Valette Video Program.

 

FRENCH II -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 75 in French I.

This course is a continuation of the first year. It increases the communicative vocabulary and presents more complex grammatical structures and verb tenses. The emphasis is more on improving the student’s ability to communicate in French. Grades are based on weekly quizzes, or tests, exams, homework and oral participation. Textbook: BLANC. Valette Video Program: “French in Action,” Capretz.

 

FRENCH III -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 75 in French II.

This course is a continuation of the second year. Grammatical structures are reviewed and more complex grammatical points are presented and practiced. The student is given opportunities to improve her/his oral skills. Cultural elements are an integral part of the course. It is usually a small class. This allows a certain flexibility to meet the needs of each student in the class. Grades are based on weekly quizzes, tests, or exams, oral presentations, homework and participation. Textbook:  ROUGE. Valette Video program: “FRENCH IN ACTION,” Capretz.

 

FRENCH IV -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 75 in French III

This course helps the student go into the language with more depth. Grammar is reviewed, vocabulary is expanded and oral skills are emphasized. The small size of the class allows for more flexibility to meet the needs of each student. Grades are based on weekly quizzes, or tests, oral presentations, homework and participation. Textbooks:Rouge.Valette.  Conversation manual:DU TAC AU TAU,Bragger/Rice.Video program: “FRENCH IN ACTION,” Capretz.

 

Spanish I -- 1.0 Credit

The first year in the Spanish sequence presents the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  There are frequent quizzes and tests.  The cultural focus is on Hispanic influence in the United States.

 

Spanish II -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: acceptable performance in Spanish I.

The second year in the Spanish sequence extends and sharpens skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  There are frequent quizzes and tests.  The cultural focus is on Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. 

 

Spanish III -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: acceptable performance in Spanish II.

The third year in the Spanish sequence extends the development of student skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  Students are introduced to some of the important Spanish-language writers.  The cultural focus is on South America. 

 

Spanish IV -- 1.0 Credit

Prerequisite: acceptable performance in Spanish III.

The fourth year in the Spanish sequence extends further the four basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  Students read selections from both classic and contemporary Spanish-language literature.  The cultural focus is on Spain. 

 

LATIN I -- Grades 9 - 12 -- 1.0 Credit     

Given every other year, alternating with Latin II

Prerequisite: None, although Middle School Introduction to Foreign Language would be useful.

In this  course, students will read stories written in the Latin language, so as to learn the vocabulary and grammar that is presented there.  They will learn the forms of nouns and adjectives, as well as the fundamental forms of verbs.  They will exercise their skills by writing brief Latin compositions, by reading Latin aloud, and occasionally by speaking Latin in class, but the emphasis will be on learning to read Latin well.  The readings will also provide a starting point for the study of Roman history and culture.

Latin I is intended as the introductory portion of a two-semester sequence.  However, students who choose to take only one semester of Latin will find that their knowledge of Latin supports and deepens their knowledge of English and other modern languages, as well as their understanding of the history of our Western Civilization. Text: ECCE ROMANI (Level I), Prentice Hall (2000).

 

LATIN II -- Grade 9 - 12 -- 1.0 Credit     

Given every other year, alternating with Latin I 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin I with a grade of 75 or higher.

This course is a sequel to Latin I, similar in both spirit and style.  Building on the foundation laid in Latin I, students will expand their horizons to complex sentence structures and the full spectrum of verb forms.  Through a varied sequence of readings, students will continue to develop their vocabulary and their knowledge of Roman history and culture.  Having successfully completed Latin II, students should be well equipped to begin reading the works of Caesar and Cicero. Text: ECCE ROMANI (Level II), Prentice Hall (2000).

 

Tech education

Learning and Using Telecommunications -- Grades 9-12 --
1.0 Credit

This course is divided into three primary units. The first introduces you to the fundamentals of computing, terminology and basic concepts. You will learn how computers actually work and how workers increasingly use computers. We will study basic operating systems and how a computer functions on a network as well as effectively and efficiently use electronic mail, web browsers, listserves and other Internet based technologies. We will use the technology to help us learn the technology.

Next we will attack a variety of speciality applications including networking operating systems, management tools and utilities, web creation and management software as well as other applications and helper software. Emphasis will be placed on student-directed learning through the use of multiple information sources including areas beyond the classroom. Students will design and present a project(s) which appropriately demonstrate mastery within their chosen area of study.

The final area of the course will center around system management and individual learning contracts. You will apply the skills learned in earlier classes to perform more complex operations and maintenance regarding your chosen area. These areas might include overseeing and managing workgroups, administering the NT LAN, administering, updating and managing a portion of the LGUHS web site or Intranet, assisting with the administration of the WCSU Internet presence, building, maintaining or repairing, or applying your skills to a community service project.

 

Computer Assisted Design & Architectural Drawing
Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

This two part course will lead you to a better understanding of Architectural design, basic planning, layout design and material functions. We start off looking at the area design. We study shape, form, function, materials and problem solving. Through problem solving techniques, we gain a historical perspective of why things are the way they are, how and why things change, and how to effectively design and invent useful and functional solutions to problems.

During the Architectural specific units, you will learn how to use the computer and appropriate software to help achieve architectural solutions. You will be expected to make several comprehensive presentations of their problems and recommended solutions. We use a lot of modeling to assist our presentations.

 

Woodworking -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

The aim of this course is to provide students with a foundation in the fundamentals of Japanese-style hand tool woodworking. From understanding wood as a resource to developing basic hand tool skills, the emphasis will be on providing students the means to complete self-directed projects.  Students will learn how to maintain and use basic hand tools.   While aimed primarily at beginners, more advanced students, particularly those with prior woodworking experience, will be provided an opportunity to enhance their skills while engaged in more challenging projects.  Grades will be based on regular class attendance and participation, quizzes, tests, and project completion.

Family education

Sew What -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

This one semester, full block class is designed to teach students basic hand and machine sewing skills, pattern use, garment construction, and a variety of sewing techniques. Each student  is required to complete 1-2 major and 2+ minor or smaller projects as well as a number of units of study. The student is financially responsible for purchasing the supplies needed for each project. Grades will be based on units of study papers and quizzes, project completion and evaluation, and weekly self-evaluations. This course may be repeated, with higher level projects and skills expected.

 

Packs and Sacks -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

This one semester, full block class is designed to help students learn basic techniques of sewing necessary to complete a pack or sack. It is especially suited for students interested in creating outdoor wear or related items such as a ski/snow board carrier or duffel bag. The student is financially responsible for purchasing the supplies needed for each project. Students will learn to operate and care for a sewing machine, to read and follow pattern and instructions, and proper sewing techniques to complete their projects. Grades will be based on units of study papers and quizzes, project completion and evaluation, and weekly self-evaluations.

 

What’s Cooking -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

This one semester, full block course will examine and explore basic cooking and baking techniques and information to help students work successfully in the kitchen. The class will begin with with a short unit on cooking terms, measuring equivalents, and measuring techniques. This knowledge will be utilized with the majority of the semester being spent in hands-on food preparation labs practicing proper cooking techniques of making: quick breads, yeast breads, soups, main dishes, side dishes, desserts, and more. ** This course is a prerequisite to Chef du Jour**

 

Chef du Jour -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

This one semester, full block, student-run class is open to students who have successfully completed What’s Cooking (or by special permission from instructor).  The course is designed to provide a service to the school, by providing at-cost meals, while teaching participating students to become more confident, competent cooks. Budgeting, pricing, meal planning, managerial skills, cooperation, teamwork, and a sense of responsibility are the goals of the class. Grading is based on student performance as a worker, their skills as a manager, in addition to the quality of their written meal plans. Meal plans are required of each student approximately five to seven times throughout the semester(based on class enrollment).

 

Family Matters -- Grades 9-12 -- .5 Credit

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to learn skills necessary to understand themselves, have successful relationships, have a successful marriage and family, and develop the knowledge and skills to have a happy, healthy child. Grades will be based on participation, case studies, projects, attendance, tests, and worksheets. This class is particularly suited to students who like discussions.

 

Crafts Around the World -- Grades 9-12 -- 1.0 Credit

With color theory and multiculturalism as the common threads, students in this one semester, full block class will explore the history and techniques of:

Students will be graded using self-evaluation, teacher evaluation, classroom clean-up and the use and care of supplies and equipment. ** This class can be used to meet the fine arts requirement.

 

Source:

http://www.wcsu.k12.vt.us/~lguhs/Visitor_Center/Academic_Offerings/Program_Studies/Virtual_High_School/virtual_high_school.html